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Pig-nosed turtles

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by bli909, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. bli909

    bli909 Egg

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    I am just curious as to what are the reasons that they are so rare here in their country of origin, but they are not even close to rare overseas? If it is being sold at this price in china, I don't think they should be hard to breed at all.
     
  2. bli909

    bli909 Egg

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    Hi everyone.
    I am a newbie to the forum. I was searching about Pig-nosed turtles this morning and was surprised that they are going extinct? Why are they so rare in Australia that some post I read said the price for a hatchling is from $1000-3000?
    I could remember when I was a child (2008) living in China before moving to Queensland. I bought one for ¥150rmb (25AUD) and there were heaps of them available in the market. Just had a search and they are now for sale at ¥250-300 (45-55 AUD) for a 5-7cm one. It does not look like they are even rare to me. Why is this happening? I could understand if they are rare to see in the wild but how come they are so rare that only few people breed them?
    Does anyone have any ideas?
     
  3. Craig

    Craig Owner/Administrator/Public Officer
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    Hi and welcome to AFT.

    Yes, the answer is simple. No one has ever been able to successfully breed this species in captivity.

    Three reasons behind this are because they are such a large freshwater turtle and they require tropical water temperatures and very large breeding facilities with large sandy nesting banks.

    Every Pig-nosed turtle sold in markets in Asia or around the rest of the World has been illegally poached from the wild from Papua New Guinea or Irian Jaya.

    This is an illegal, greedy and rampant practice that cannot be sustained and numbers in the wild have reduced to a stage that they may never recover. At one stage there was a 777 aeroplane that had all of its seats removed and it was making weekly trips from Indonesia to China with 100 Tonnes of freshwater turtles from Indonesia and Irian Jaya for the food market and pet trade. 100 Tonnes!

    The same goes for Australian Pig-nosed turtles that are in captivity.

    There have been people here in Australia who have illegally caught gravid females and taken them home and induced them so that they lay their eggs and then claimed that they bred them. There are others who have illegally imported hundreds of them and passed them off as Australian Pig-nosed turtles and sold them just to make money $$$$$. This includes the Albino Pig-nosed turtles that have been sold in Australia in the past.

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    If you ever get the opportunity, I would thoroughly recommend that you buy a book called the Asian Turtle Trade to read as the book helps to explain why so many freshwater turtle species around the World are now extinct or are on their way to becoming extinct due to Asia's practices and appetite for freshwater turtles all around the World for the food market and pet industry.

    The Asian Turtle Crisis


    “When the last individual of a race of living things breathes no more,
    another heaven and another earth must pass away for such a one can be again.”



    — William Beebe, Naturalist
    The exploitation of Asian turtles
    has brought many species to the brink of extinction.

    • “The living chelonians of the world are in perilous decline. Today, there is no more serious turtle crisis than that which is taking place in Southeast Asia and southern China. Southeast Asia is being vacuumed of its turtles for China’s food markets.”

      — John L. Behler, Wildlife Conservation Society
    • “A billion people in China, formerly constrained from regular consumption of luxury foods like turtle by lack of cash, are wielding new-found economic power. Ross Perot might describe the ‘giant sucking sound’ of millions of turtles being wrenched from their habitats in Laos, Cambodia, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Malaysia, and Indonesia to meet the insatiable demand and high prices offered by Chinese markets.”


      — Peter C. H. Pritchard, Chelonia Institute
    • “Survivors of countless millennia, turtles on the brink of our new millennium face imminent demise at the hands of humans. We are facing a turtle survival crisis unprecedented in its severity and risk. Without intervention, countless species will be lost over the next few decades.


      — Anders G. J. Rhodin, Chelonia Research Foundation
    • “We are on the brink of losing a group of animals that has managed to survive the upheavals of the last 200 million years, including the great extinction episode that eliminated the dinosaurs.”


      — Russell Mittermeier, Conservation International


    The decline of turtle and tortoise populations worldwide has been cause for serious concern among scientists and wildlife conservationists for more than twenty years. But over the past decade the impact of the Chinese market on the already precarious status of Asian turtles has reached disastrous proportions. Early alarms were sounded at the 1993 symposium in Purchase, New York, Conservation, Restoration, and Management of Tortoises and Turtles — An International Conference (see overview of conference proceedings). Reports at subsequent meetings have further documented the ongoing and, in many cases, precipitous declines.

    Over the past several years, articles in the popular press have raised public awareness. Reports, news articles, links, and photographs on this site bring together much of the currently available material. Together, they just begin to reveal the extent and gravity of this crisis. We are seeking reports from Southeast Asian countries on the population status and degree of exploitation of their indigenous turtles, as well as information on local and international protective efforts. Contributions of additional material are welcome; please contact us.

    Asian Turtle Crisis.jpg
     
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  4. bli909

    bli909 Egg

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    OK I see. It is actually sad to see that they are being sold at a price that is this cheap. Pig-nosed turtles are a species that are very hard to care for as they do require very high water quality. Also I've noticed that for very long people had been taking turtles out of their natural habitat and be shipped to the US and Asia for sale. I know that exotic turtle species are now hard to be imported to China but lots of local species had been driven to extinction including the most common ones such as Reeves turtles.
     
  5. bli909

    bli909 Egg

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    I could remember that there were Green sea turtles for sale back in 2008 for ¥150($20). Those sea turtles must be sourced illegally from the wild for free.
     
  6. Craig

    Craig Owner/Administrator/Public Officer
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    It is highly illegal to take any Marine turtle from the wild and is also illegal to sell them.