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Repashy Food for Turtles?

Discussion in 'Diet and Feeding' started by FuzzyM, Sep 6, 2017.

  1. FuzzyM

    FuzzyM Hatchling Turtle

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    Any ideas on suitability of Repashy foods for our Turtles?
    I imagine something like their grub pie mix for insectivores?

    http://www.repashy.com.au/

    Seems a bit easier than making up turtle pudding perhaps.
     
  2. Aussiepride83

    Aussiepride83 Administrator
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    I can't seem to find any of the ingredients...

    OK I found them...

    GRUB PIE-REPTILE

    Insectivore Gel Premix



    Our Insect Based (75%) Meal Replacement Gel for Insectivorous Species of Reptiles and Amphibians. Great for Bearded Dragons, Skinks, Dwarf Monitors, Salamanders and more. Insects are raised in the USA on high quality ingredients!



    INGREDIENTS: Insect Meal, Dried Seaweed Meal, Coconut Meal, Ground Flaxseed, Stabilized Rice Bran, Dried Brewers Yeast, Lecithin, Dried Kelp, Locust Bean Gum, Calcium Carbonate, Potassium Citrate, Salt, Taurine, Watermelon, RoseHips, Hibiscus Flower, Calendula Flower, Marigold Flower, Paprika, Turmeric, Salt, Calcium Propionate and Potassium Sorbate (as preservatives), Magnesium Amino Acid Chelate, Zinc Methionine Hydroxy Analogue Chelate, Manganese Methionine Hydroxy Analogue Chelate, Copper Methionine Hydroxy Analogue Chelate, Selenium Yeast. Vitamins: (Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Choline Chloride, L-Ascorbyl-Polyphosphate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin, Beta Carotene, Pantothenic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B-12 Supplement, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex).



    Guaranteed Analysis: Crude Protein min. 40%, Crude Fat min. 12%, Crude Fiber max. 15%, Moisture max. 10%, Ash max. 12%, Calcium min. 1.5%.



    DIRECTIONS: Bring water to a boil on stove, in microwave or kettle. Pour boiling water into a bowl and immediately stir in powder (1 part powder to 2-3 parts water). Let cool or immediately pour into mold. Gel will set at room temperature. Cut into pieces or long strips for feeding. Once made, gel should be treated as fresh food and can be sealed and stored in refrigerator for up to two weeks, or freezer for up to six months.



    Made in USA.

    Refrigeration will extend freshness

    NOT FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION
     
  3. FuzzyM

    FuzzyM Hatchling Turtle

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    Any conclusions?
     
  4. Craig

    Craig Founding Member/Administrator/Public Officer
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    I'd steer clear of it for the reasons below:


    Re: Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex


    While it’s a little noticed pet food ingredient, Menadione Sodium Bisulfate (and it’s many named variations) is one ingredient to look out for and avoid. This ingredient is commonly found in many dog foods, cat foods, and treats. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have the best reputation for being a safe or useful pet food ingredient. Since there are alternatives for pet food makers to use, it makes you wonder why some put our pets at risk.

    Menadione Sodium Bisulfate is a synthetic version of vitamin K. You’ll see it within the fine print of many pet foods ingredient list. In addition, of course, it’s not as simple to find it as it should be. Some pet food ingredient lists will say ‘menadione’, and some will mention vitamin K3 in parenthesis – and these are just a few of the possible variations you have to look for.

    This ingredient is added to pet foods and treats as an inexpensive source of vitamin K. In people – deficiencies of vitamin K can lead to blood clotting particularly in the stomach and can lead to intestinal complications. An example for pets, veterinarians will administer an injection of K1 (not the synthetic K3) to a pet who has consumed a rat poison which causes internal bleeding. Food sources of natural vitamin K (K1) are green leafy vegetables; which are not on the ‘top ten’ list of many pets. Pet food ingredients that could provide natural sources of vitamin K are alfalfa and kelp. However, as you probably have figured out, synthetic vitamin K or menadione is a great deal less expensive than the natural sources of alfalfa and kelp.

    Knowing that a pet food company would opt for a synthetic ingredient in contrast to a natural ingredient is bad enough, but it takes one step further on the ‘bad scale’ with Menadione Sodium Bisulfate. This ingredient can be highly toxic in high doses. Hazard information regarding menadione lists “carcinogenic effects” and states “the substance is toxic to kidneys, lungs, liver, mucous membranes. Repeated or prolonged exposure to the substance can produce target organs damage.” http://www.sciencelab.com/xMSDS-Menadione sodium bisulfite-9924604
    More information on menadione sodium bisulfate and pets can be read at http://www.dogfoodproject.com/index.php?page=menadione.

    With the science based information available on this ingredient, there is no sound reason for menadione to be considered as a pet food or pet treat ingredient; that is other than a big money saver for a pet food company. AAFCO and the FDA have no restrictions to the use of menadione in pet foods, and the pet food can even proudly claim ‘Natural’ on the label even if it contains this unnatural ingredient. Look at the fine print of your pet’s food and treats for menadione; sources of natural vitamin K (alfalfa and kelp) seem to be a far better option.

    Author
    Susan Thixton
    Pet Food Safety Advocate
    Author, Buyer Beware
     
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  5. Craig

    Craig Founding Member/Administrator/Public Officer
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    After just discovering how potentially dangerous Menadione Sodium Bisulfate/Menadione is, I just did a bit of research and have found out the two turtle pellet brands we recommend both contain Menadione Sodium Bisulfate/Menadione and AFT will no longer be recommending them!
    We will do some more research and try to find pellets that contain a natural source of Vitamin K instead of Menadione Sodium Bisulfate/Menadione/ Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex with the correct
    Calcium : Phosphorous ratio of at least 2:1


    :deadly:Menadione supplements have been banned by the FDA because of their high toxicity and carcinogenic qualities.:deadly:

    Exo Terra Floating Pellets - Aquatic Turtle Juvenile / Floating Pellet ingredients
    Ingredients: Fish meal, soy flour, wheat flour, glycerol, soluble fish protein concentrate, potato meal, corn gluten meal, rice hull, shrimp meal, squid liver meal, lignocellulose, dicalcium phosphate, fish oil (preserved with ethoxyquin), spirulina algae meal, lecithin, choline chloride, DL-methionine, yeast extract, fructooligosaccharide, ferrous carbonate, calcium L-ascorbyl-2-monophosphate, zinc oxide, manganous oxide, vitamin E supplement, niacin, beta-carotene, cupric sulfate, d-calcium pantothenate, riboflavin, thiamin mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid,

    :deadly:Menadione sodium bisulfite complex(source of vitamin K activity), calcium iodate, cobalt carbonate, sodium selenite, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement, vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3 supplement.
    Guaranteed Analysis: Crude Protein (min): 35.0 %, Crude Fat (min): 5.0 %, Crude Fiber (max): 3.3 %, Moisture (max): 13.0 %, Calcium (min): 2.0 %, Calcium (max): 2.4 %, Phosphorus (min): 1.0 %, Vitamin A (min) 15,000 IU/kg, Vitamin D3 (min) 2,100 IU/kg.

    Cichlid Gold Floating Pellet ingredients
    Fish Meal, Flaked Corn, Wheat Flour, Gluten Meal, Brewers' Dried Yeast, Dried A Niger Fermentaion Extract, Garlic, Astaxanthin, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (Source Of Vitamin C), Vitamin B12 Supplement, Biotin, Calcium Pantothenate, Choline Chloride, D Activated Animal Sterol (Source Of Vitamin D3), Folic Acid,:deadly: Menadione Sodium Bisulfite (Source Of Vitamin K Activity), Inositol, Para-Aminobenzoic Acid, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Salt, Ferrous Chloride, Copper Sulfate, Cobalt Sulfate, Aluminum Sulfate, Magnesium Sulfate.
     
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  6. FuzzyM

    FuzzyM Hatchling Turtle

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    Interesting!
    I mostly feed my fish New Life spectrum pellets.

    This is the ingredients of the large floating cichlid pellet:

    New Life Spectrum® food is made with high quality, easily digestible South Antarctic Krill, Herring, and several all-natural colour-enhancing ingredients for a balanced diet that boosts immune system function and enhances the full spectrum of your fish’s colour. With the belief that all fish require a complete and fully balanced varied diet, New Life also contains Algae Meal, that consists of Seaweed, Kelp, and Haematococcus pluvialis (a micro algae), a premium grade of natural Spirulina, as well as a fruit & vegetable extract.

    All New Life Spectrum® products also contain a generous inclusion rate of Garlic (Allium Sativum) with the Thera-A formulas containing a mega-dose of this natural anti-parasitic ingredient.

    All ingredients used are almost identical, since we cannot find anything better than what we are using. However, the crude analysis will be different due to the percentage of ingredients incorporated into a specific formula.

    Typical Ingredients:

    Whole Antarctic Krill, Whole Herring, Whole Wheat Flour, Algae, Beta Carotene, Spirulina, Garlic, Vegetable and Fruit Extract, Vitamin A Acetate, Vitamin D Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Folic Acid, Niacin, Biotin, Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (Stable C), Ethylenediamine Dihydroiodide, Cobalt Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate, Choline Chloride.
     
  7. Craig

    Craig Founding Member/Administrator/Public Officer
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    Unfortunately the following highlighted ingredients ruin it for turtles as they contain multiple anti nutrient properties that are a very poor choice for turtles.

    New Life Spectrum Cichlid

    Improved colour Improved health

    Easy to digest protein from whole Krill and whole Herring - without soybean products!

    Formulated for all types of omnivore, herbivore and carnivore Cichlids.

    High nutrition density for less waste and cleaner water.

    Enhances the full spectrum of your fish's colour.

    Feeding Instructions:

    Feed Twice Daily. Amount given should be completely consumed withing 1-2 minutes.

    Ingredients: Whole Antartic Krill Meal, Whole Herring Meal, Whole Wheat Flour, Algae Meal, Beta Carotene, Spirulina, Garlic, Vegetable and Fruit Extract (Spinach, Red and Green Cabbage, Pea,Broccoli, Red Pepper, Zucchini, Tomato, Kiwi, Apricot, Pear, Mango, Apple, Papaya, Peach), Vitamin A Acetate, DL Alphatocophero (E), D-Activated Animal-Sterol (D3) Vitamin B-12 Suplement, Niacin, Folic Acid, Biotin, Thiamine, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxin Hydrochloride, Calcium Pantothenate, L-Ascorby-2-Polyphosphate (Stable C), Choline Chloride, Copper Proteinate, Ethylenediamine Dihydroiodide, Cobalt Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate.
    Vitamin A Acetate, DL Alphatocophero (E), D-Activated Animal-Sterol (D3) Vitamin B-12 Suplement, Niacin, Folic Acid, Biotin, Thiamine, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxin Hydrochloride, Calcium Pantothenate, L-Ascorby-2-Polyphosphate (Stable C), Choline Chloride, Copper Proteinate, Ethylenediamine Dihydroiodide, Cobalt Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate.
     
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  8. Aussiepride83

    Aussiepride83 Administrator
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    I agree. Those ingredients Craig has highlighted in the New Life Spectrum pellets, especially the peas and spinach, would be causing your turtle to have a serious calcium deficiency. That information has been around for over 40 years. Those pellets should be thrown out immediately.

    The following is taken from a thread I created several months back for the proper care and feeding of turtles in captivity. The thread can be found here. https://www.australianfreshwatertur...aquarium-for-turtles-and-feeding-guide.15322/

    Feeding your turtle/s.
    You have one simple goal when feeding your turtle, learn what your particular species eats in the wild and strive to simulate this in captivity. For all reptiles, especially turtles, a diet with the correct calcium to phosphorous ratio is important to maintain bone integrity. If the turtle does not receive enough calcium in the diet to maintain the correct level in the blood, the needed calcium is taken from the bones. The bones are softened and the muscles weaken. This syndrome is termed Metabolic Bone Disease or MBD.
    For turtles, the importance of maintaining good bone/shell strength is obvious. All you have to do is provide the foods that enable the turtle to maintain this balance and it's not complicated. Avoid exclusively feeding foods that are high in phosphorous and low in calcium like mealworms, crickets and peas.

    ALL fruits and vegetables intended for human consumption, especially peas and spinach should NEVER EVER be fed to aquatic turtles. With its oxalic acid content, Spinach presents a special problem. This combines with calcium to form an insoluble salt, calcium oxalate, which builds up in the kidneys. All meats like mince, steak, chicken, lean silverside and roo meat AND ALL FROZEN TURTLE DINNERS containing ANY of the above mentioned items should also be avoided. These contain way too much complex protein for turtles that haven't evolved to eat such items and the resulting effects of such a diet are severe nutritional deficiencies, deformity ( such as pyramiding, tenting and scalloping) and premature death.
     
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  9. FuzzyM

    FuzzyM Hatchling Turtle

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    As mentioned in my post, I only feed the New Life Spectrum pellets to my fish, not my turtle.
     
  10. Craig

    Craig Founding Member/Administrator/Public Officer
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    Hi, you said you "I mostly feed my fish New Life spectrum pellets" which means not just your fish, otherwise you would have stated that you "Only" feed the pellets to your fish. Hence our replies about us not recommending them for your turtles.
     
  11. FuzzyM

    FuzzyM Hatchling Turtle

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    What I meant was that I also feed my fish various other foods. I have a pretty wide variety of fish, shell dwelling cichlids, corydoras, silver dollars. red rainbows to name a few. Varied fish with varied diets.

    I don't actually own any new life pellets that would be large enough for my turtle to bother with.

    My Macleay gets an AFT approved diet. Mostly val and glass shrimp.
     
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